UK Registered Charity 1122246 This website would not be possible without the kind help of Tony Martin of the “AV Martin Charitable Foundation”

The vast majority of vets do not work in large veterinary hospitals or educational institutions; nor do the majority work in veterinary chains or franchises. Most vets work in small independent practices where they generally have to rely upon themselves and perhaps a small number of colleagues to develop the practices and protocols that will enable them to give the best care to their patients.

These pages are designed to help you find the approaches and answers that will best support your work as a vet in a small practice. The information provided is not exhaustive, but will give a clear indication of the general issues around which good practice can be based.

This section ‘My Practice’ is authored by Mike Jessop and Pam Mosedale

“With the continuing role of maintaining the highest level of infection control in veterinary practices across the UK, qualified veterinary nurses, and other lay members of the nursing team (animal care assistants, etc) are always relying on the most up to date information on procedures & protocols on how best to reduce the risk of MRSA, and other drug-resistant bacteria. BMF provides an informative website on all such matters, and is equally as helpful to the general public. The BVNA continues to support to the excellent work carried out by the BMF, and ensures that its nursing members continue to have access to a useful source of information whenever it is needed.”

Claire Fraser RVN MBVNA, President of The British Veterinary Nursing Association (BVNA) 2011-2012

All about infections

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Symptoms

If you notice these symptoms report them to your vet immediately. You may be suspicious of a complex and/or resistant infection if you pet has: A wound that will not [&hellip

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MRSA in Farm Animals

In 2005, the first report on MRSA in pigs came from The Netherlands. A relation was found between MRSA positive persons and living on a pig farm or working with [&hellip

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MRSA In Horses

Staphylococcus aureus can also be found in the nose, intestinal tract or skin of a small percentage of normal, healthy horses, although the frequency with which it is found varies [&hellip

How we have Helped

I was truly devastated and lost hearing the diagnosis of MRSA. I thought my dog’s life was over. The MRSA was on my dog’s nose and diagnosed with a punch [&hellip

Alaska Sky

Last month my thirteen-year-old miniature dachsund, Jenna, developed a swollen eye. I assumed that she had been bit by a spider or an ant, but after the swelling returned following [&hellip

Jill Vicino – Jenna

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