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How Do I know if I have a problem?

MRSA, MRSP and other resistant bacteria do not have an obvious clinical signature. A wound contaminated with resistant and non resistant strains will have similar clinical presentations.


What may alert the clinician to a resistance problem would be the lack of response to first line antibiotic therapy.

As the majority of surgical routines will not involve antibiotic therapy, any post-operative sepsis will need a detailed clinical assessment.

  • Simple cases where a cause is obvious such as persistent patient licking, the use of preventative measures or first line systemic antibiotics or topical therapy should resolve the problem
  • Complex problems where sepsis seems to be extensive may require bacteriology and sensitivity of closely monitored antibiotic therapy.

Individual cases of resistant infection are likely to be externally acquired. When a cluster of cases appears, the practice should urgently review its sepsis regime.

It is advisable for practices to audit post-operative complications on a regular basis. This can be invaluable for assessing the frequency of post-operative sepsis. This audit will quickly identify and outbreak of hospital acquired infections and enables the practice to localise the outbreak to a specific routine or member of staff.

 

Jill Moss, through The Bella Moss Foundation, has worked tirelessly to ensure that MRSA and other Hospital Acquired infections remain firmly in focus for the veterinary profession. The constant updating of knowledge has been a cornerstone of The Bella Moss Foundation. The changing attitude of professionals to the risks of hospital acquired infections has to a large extent been down to the work of The Foundation.

Mr Mike Jessop, MRCVS (Former) President British Small animal veterinary association (BSAVA)

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Flash – March 14, 2000 – November 7, 2006 Flash was born in 2000. He was neutered at age 2 and has had urinary tract problems ever since. He may [&hellip

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