UK Registered Charity 1122246 This website would not be possible without the kind help of Tony Martin of the “AV Martin Charitable Foundation”

1.   Formulating a whole practice biosecurity & infection control policy, designing & implementing cleaning protocols for all areas of the practice. 

2.   Keeping staff awareness levels high by regular training and evaluation.

3.   Cleanliness and hygiene throughout the practice.

4.   Targeted cleaning of items that can facilitate spread of potential contaminants for example:

  • Hand washing between patients & after each examination, especially if handling mouths, wounds etc
  • Table top sepsis
  • Instrument sepsis:  1. Stethoscope  2. Ophthalmoscope/Otoscope  3. Chip Scanner  4. Thermometer  5.Anaesthetic monitor devices
  • Regular cleaning of Hand touch areas
  • Computer keyboards/mice
  • Door handles

5.    Ward hygiene – clean kennels between patients, remove soiled bedding promptly, cover wounds & surgical drains, catheter maintenance

6.    Making one member of staff responsible for infection control

7.    Having good isolation & barrier nursing procedures for any potentially infected animals

8.    Surgical Asepsis

  • Organising surgical lists so that clean procedures are always carried out before any possibly contaminated procedure
  • Restricting entry to theatre to only personnel involved in surgical procedure & anaesthesia.
  • Good surgical site preparation
  • Good instrument sterility
  • Good surgeon sterility including protective clothing
  • Gentle surgical technique

9.    Auditing cleaning protocols regularly to ensure that they are being carried out correctly

10.  Practice policies for responsible use of antibiotics.

11.  Clinical audit of post-operative complications

Monitoring and evaluation of sepsis will keep the practice in close surveillance of the pattern of infections seen within surgical patients. It will act as an alert for general sepsis and quality of aseptic techniques and protocols. It will act as a rapid warning system in the event of a cluster of hospital acquired infections.

 

There has been a worrying increase in the numbers of pets reported with MRSA infection. The causes for this seem to be complex and research to understand this emerging infection in animals and people is continuing. The Bella Moss foundation has been very helpful explaining to pet owners the complexity of issues involved.”

Professor David Lloyd Bvetmed. PhD, FRCVS, DipECVD, ILTM Professor of Veterinary Dermatology, Royal Veterinary College, Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences http://www.rvc.ac.uk

Videos

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All about infections

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Treatments

Infections can generally be treated successfully with a single course of antibiotics, which may come in the form of creams or ointments, injections, or tablets, and many infections will even [&hellip

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MRSA in Farm Animals

In 2005, the first report on MRSA in pigs came from The Netherlands. A relation was found between MRSA positive persons and living on a pig farm or working with [&hellip

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Testing for MRSA

How do we test for MRSA? The only way to identify MRSA is to take a sample and analyse it in a laboratory. A culture can identify the bacteria and [&hellip

How we have Helped

My story is how the Bella Moss foundation really touched my life and saved my best friends life. I had come to the end of the road with my dog [&hellip

Jaclynn – Dusty

This is a story about a little min-pin named Princess, her blessed owner Patty, and the friends they met along their journey, the Bella Moss foundation, which, without them, our [&hellip

Princess

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