UK Registered Charity 1122246 This website would not be possible without the kind help of Tony Martin of the “AV Martin Charitable Foundation”

In 2005, the first report on MRSA in pigs came from The Netherlands. A relation was found between MRSA positive persons and living on a pig farm or working with pigs. Studies on pig farms and in pig slaughterhouses revealed high percentages of MRSA positive pigs. Studies on veal farms also found high percentages of MRSA positive veal calves. In a pilot study on broiler slaughterhouses MRSA positive broilers were found as well.

What about eating meat?

It has been shown that LA-MRSA is present in very small amounts on fresh meat, but the human health hazard of meat consumption is negligible.

Are farmers at risk?

People who are (professionally) in close contact with pigs or veal calves are often MRSA positive, without any clinical signs. When these people are hospitalized for e.g. surgery, or in contact with seriously ill people, MRSA infections might occur. When infections, occur it is wise to mention that there is a chance that MRSA is the cause of the infection. The physician might want to start treatment with another drug than usual.

Is livestock-associated MRSA distinct from ‘classical human strains’?

In the lab a distinction can be made between the MRSA strain found in livestock and the ‘classical human strains’. Livestock-associated MRSA (LA-MRSA) seems to be less transmissible between humans and causes less severe infections.

Are visitors from a children’s farm at risk?

The risk on getting MRSA from animals increases with the intensiveness and length of the contact between humans and animals. On a children’s farm there is no long-lasting and intensive contact with livestock, so the human health hazard is negligible. In general, it is wise to wash your hands with water and soap after visiting a children’s farm.

 

 

BMF expresses thanks to the author
Els M. Broens / DVM Quantitative Veterinary Epidemiology / Wageningen University Centre for Infectious Disease Control Netherlands / National Institute for Public Health and the Environment

Did you know...

Surgical sites, cuts or grazes can become infected by bacteria falling from the skin into the wound, from contaminated hands or instruments, or by droplets from an uncovered mouth or nose.

All about infections

PC_symptoms-header

Symptoms

If you notice these symptoms report them to your vet immediately. You may be suspicious of a complex and/or resistant infection if you pet has: A wound that will not [&hellip

PC-mrsa-in-pigs-field-blue-skies-header

MRSA in Pigs

In spite of worrying reports of the spread of MRSA ST398 in pigs in Europe and N. America, in two recent, major EU surveys (EFSA 2009, 2010) the UK pig industry was [&hellip

PC_hygiene-prec-header

How Bacteria are Spread

Humans and animals all carry their own specialised colonies of bacteria. These are generally harmless in the normal course of events and serve to prevent the growth of alien bacteria [&hellip

How we have Helped

My dog Larry became infected with MRSA following cruciate ligament surgery (just like Bella did) I searched the website for information on pets and MRSA and found The Bella Moss [&hellip

Charlotte Hudley – Larry

Update October 7th 2006 by Jill Moss – “I am so upset by the fact that after so many months of battling with all the very best care there could [&hellip

Xena

View more

Corporate Supporters

Educational Partners

Media Supporters

Supporters