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What to do if you are picking your pet up after hospitalisation or you have queries about your pet’s illness 

Your vet or nurse will give you advice about what you need to do when your pet has an infection, but ask as many questions as you can.

It’s a good idea before you pick up your pet from your vet’s to write down a list of everything you want to know.  That way you won’t forget anything.

Here are some of the questions you may want to ask your vet.  Make sure you write in the answers they give you during a consultation as it’s easy to forget what’s said.

 

Question Answer
Should I, my family or anyone who’s had contact with my pet go to my doctor for a check up to make sure I’m not infected?
Does my pet have to be kept in a room away from pets and people?
Do I have to wear any special clothes when I give my pet the medicines or enter the room my pet’s in if my pet is apart from everyone else?  Can you give examples?
Can I have any physical contact with my pet?  For example, should I avoid face to face contact with my pet or other members of my family?  Can I stroke my pet?
When should I wash my hands if I’m allowed contact with my pet?
How do I give the medicine?  Do I have to wear rubber gloves when I do this?
Do I need to wash my pet’s dishes in a special way?
What do I need to look out for?
When should I contact you?
How often do you want to see my pet?
What do I do if my pet doesn’t seem to be getting better on the medicine I’m giving to my pet?
How do I wash my pet’s wound?
How do I stop my pet licking at the wound?
How do I stop my pet chewing the bandage?

 

Question Answer
How long do you think it will take to get my pet better?
What’s the risk that my pet will die?
How should I wash my pet’s bedding or should I discard it?
Can visitors still come to my home?  Is it riskier if they are babies who crawl around the floor or elderly relatives?

 

Author – Elaine Pendlebury BA BSc  BVetMed DMS MRCVS  Senior Veterinary Surgeon (Science & Welfare) PDSA

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