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Your vet will have started your pet on medication to treat the MRSA/MRSP infection (often antibiotic tablets, capsules, injections and sometimes shampoos or creams). In some cases, wound infection can be resolved before complete healing is achieved. In those circumstances it is important to reduce MRSA/MRSP contamination from the environment to prevent re-infection of the wound. MRSA and MRSP can survive on dry surfaces for many months and can re-infect your pet. Similarly, people or other animals in the house and the patient itself may all carry MRSA/MRSP in their noses or on skin without any harm to their bodies, but they may pass MRSA/MRSP back to a susceptible patient.

For MRSA, your doctor may take a swab from your nose to find out whether you are a carrier yourself. MRSP carriage is more frequent in dogs than in people and your vet can swab your pets for carriage (you will be asked to cover the cost as part of the treatment regime for your pet). Once you know whether you or other family members carry MRSA you can discuss with your doctor whether treatment is required and with your vet how any carrier pets should be managed. Your vet can call experts at universities or referral centres for advice if required.

Did you know...

Sick, very old and very young animals are those that are most at risk.

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All about infections

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How Bacteria are Spread

Humans and animals all carry their own specialised colonies of bacteria. These are generally harmless in the normal course of events and serve to prevent the growth of alien bacteria [&hellip

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Spotting Infections

Infections can generally be treated successfully with a single course of antibiotics, which may come in the form of creams or ointments, injections, or tablets, and many infections will even [&hellip

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Bugs Explained

Meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is only one of a number of bacteria that can be resistant to lots of different antibiotics. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a relatively common finding in long-standing [&hellip

How we have Helped

Just before Christmas 2005 I discovered a growth on Flo’s the terrier’s chest. We knew about MRSA because a family member had contracted it while in hospital and we were [&hellip

Jane Maclure – Flo

My husband contracted MRSA, 3weeks following hip replacement surgery on August 28th. When we took him to the hospital we left some soiled bandages on the couch. When I came [&hellip

Margaret McNicholl

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