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Bacteria that live on our bodies normally are called “commensal bacteria”. Our bodies are protected by a network of extremely sophisticated defenses, the immune system. Commensal bacteria are controlled by the immune system, and are prevented from getting to places in the body where they could cause problems (i.e., infection).

However, if our defenses are broken – for example, through a deep cut in the skin or a surgical wound; or in certain conditions which stop the immune system from working properly – then commensals like S. aureus and MRSA can break away from immune system control, grow uncontrollably and cause infections.

MRSA can therefore cause infections, and because it is often resistant to many of the antibiotics we use, it is more difficult to kill than other bacteria – hence being called a “superbug”.

Infections with MRSA will often look the same as infections with “normal” S. aureus. So, historically, when infection happened, a patient would be treated with antibiotics that would work against normal S. aureus. Because MRSA is resistant to these antibiotics, it would not be affected by the antibiotic; so, the infection would get much worse over time – sometimes resulting in death of the patient. MRSA has been implicated in deaths of up to 5000 human patients a year in the UK (many more internationally). The number of animal deaths it is involved in is unknown.

These days, any suspicious infection in a human hospital will be sampled to check if MRSA is involved. If it is identified early enough, MRSA can be treated successfully – in both humans and animals.

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All about infections

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Skin Infections & Pyoderma

1. How significant is infected dermatitis to the overall health of a dog? Superficial bacterial skin infections or pyoderma rarely cause significant illness. The clinical signs include itching, pustules, scaling [&hellip

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MRSA In Horses

Staphylococcus aureus can also be found in the nose, intestinal tract or skin of a small percentage of normal, healthy horses, although the frequency with which it is found varies [&hellip

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Testing for MRSA

How do we test for MRSA? The only way to identify MRSA is to take a sample and analyse it in a laboratory. A culture can identify the bacteria and [&hellip

How we have Helped

Firstly i must say how sorry i was to read Bella’s story, until Monday the 21st March i was totally unaware that this but was contractable by pets (ignorant i [&hellip

Graham Marriott

We have a very special and sweet golden retriever male dog named Bud. Bud is the only puppy that I have not rescued but picked out of a litter. Actually [&hellip

Gary and Angel – Bud

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