UK Registered Charity 1122246 This website would not be possible without the kind help of Tony Martin of the “AV Martin Charitable Foundation”

(TPLO surgery, post op infection in a dog)

The vast majority of infections occurring in companion animals occur after bone (orthopaedic) surgery, especially where pins, screws and other materials need to be left inside the body. Infections can also occur in longer-term conditions such as dermatitis and, in particular, non-healing wounds which can have pus dripping from them.

  

Emma now recovered from MRSA following surgery on her foot

All skin infections look similar. (Click Here) Skin can become red, hot and swollen. Boils or other abnormal signs such as non-healing wounds may be present. Pus is often a sign of infection.

We always worry when a pet becomes lethargic or loses their appetite. You should always report these signs to your vet; however, they do NOT necessarily mean that your pet has an infection.

If you notice skin irritation, redness, other abnormalities of the skin, or a non-healing surgical wound, then report this to your vet. Taking samples to find out whether bacteria are involved (and if so, what antibiotics will kill them) is always a very good idea – and if the patient is a high-risk case, sampling is extremely important. The techniques used are called “cytology” and “culture and sensitivity”. Cytology tells us if there is an infection happening (it’s possible for bacteria to be present but not actually be causing a problem); Culture and sensitivity testing tells us what bacteria are present and which antibiotics are likely to kill them.

These samples allow us to know that we should definitely use an antibiotic, and help us to choose one knowing that it is likely to work. Without doing these tests, we would have to simply make a guess and choose something off the shelf. However, testing is more expensive, and it will take a few days for results to come back; so the vet will normally choose an antibiotic that they think is likely to do the job in the meantime.

DON’T PANIC – inflammation of a surgical wound is common as part of the healing process; and even if infection is present, the vast majority of cases do NOT have MRSA.

All about infections

PC_skin_infections-header

Skin Infections & Pyoderma

1. How significant is infected dermatitis to the overall health of a dog? Superficial bacterial skin infections or pyoderma rarely cause significant illness. The clinical signs include itching, pustules, scaling [&hellip

PC_hygiene-prec-header

How Bacteria are Spread

Humans and animals all carry their own specialised colonies of bacteria. These are generally harmless in the normal course of events and serve to prevent the growth of alien bacteria [&hellip

GEN-bacteria-bugs-explained-header

Bugs Explained

Meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is only one of a number of bacteria that can be resistant to lots of different antibiotics. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a relatively common finding in long-standing [&hellip

How we have Helped

Freya is our 2 1/2 year old Doberman. On the 16th September 2007, she was running to pick up her toy in the park and as she turned to come [&hellip

Chris and Julie – Freya

I have had dogs my entire life, and have loved each of them for their quirks and personality, companionship and friendship. However, my current dog Tipper is “that” dog. My [&hellip

Leslie – Tipper

View more

Corporate Supporters

Educational Partners

Media Supporters

Supporters