UK Registered Charity 1122246 This website would not be possible without the kind help of Tony Martin of the “AV Martin Charitable Foundation”

Interestingly, in any country, the types of MRSA found causing colonization or infection in pets are generally the same types found in the local human hospitals! This suggests that somehow the MRSA has come from the hospital to the animal – the primary source of MRSA in pets may be human hospitals.

Human Carriage

Approximately one third of people are carrying S. aureus around in their nose at any given time. Most of these do not have MRSA, as the staph they are carrying are methicllin-susceptible. The percentage of healthy people that are carrying MRSA at any given time is lower, with typical reports ranging from <1-5%, depending on the country and whether the person is at increased risk for encountering MRSA (i.e. working in a human hospital or veterinary clinic, working with pigs in areas where MRSA is in livestock, people that are frequently hospitalized or in longterm care…) The vast majority of people that are carrying MRSA never go on to develop an infection, but they are at increased risk of infection in certain situations, like if they require surgery.

Strains

In the UK (human) hospitals, most problems are caused by strains of MRSA called EMRSA-15 and EMRSA-16.

In North America, a strain called USA100 is most common in people in hospitals, although a strain called USA300 is common in people in the general population and in some hospitals.

All about infections

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How Bacteria are Spread

Humans and animals all carry their own specialised colonies of bacteria. These are generally harmless in the normal course of events and serve to prevent the growth of alien bacteria [&hellip

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Testing for MRSA

How do we test for MRSA? The only way to identify MRSA is to take a sample and analyse it in a laboratory. A culture can identify the bacteria and [&hellip

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Symptoms

If you notice these symptoms report them to your vet immediately. You may be suspicious of a complex and/or resistant infection if you pet has: A wound that will not [&hellip

How we have Helped

The support I have received from Jill @ pets-mrsa has been invaluable. Through her I have been helped and given advice from several top veterinary surgeons and microbiologists. My dog [&hellip

Anna Foster (London)

My dog Makena is 10 years old and has always been my little buddy who always seemed to bring joy into my life. She had been sick for some time [&hellip

Kathleen – Makena

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