UK Registered Charity 1122246 This website would not be possible without the kind help of Tony Martin of the “AV Martin Charitable Foundation”

BMF case now owner and cat are doing well

If two individuals are healthy, MRSA can spread from one to the other without either noticing – it is in people and animals that have wounds or some form of immune system problem that such transmission is more likely to cause infection. As it lives on the skin, in the airways and in the environment, MRSA can be spread by skin-to-skin contact (e.g. shaking hands; contact sports) or from indirect contact (e.g. sharing exercise equipment; coughs and sneezes). It can be spread from one environment to another by being carried on people or animals (e.g. a person can take a strain of MRSA from their home with them to a hospital).

MRSA may move in this way from:

  1. a person to their environment
  2. the environment to another person,
  3. from one person to another person
  4. from a person to an animal
  5. from an animal to a person
  6. from a person to an animal
  7. from an animal to their environment
  8. from the environment to an animal

It is worth noting that MRSA is less commonly found on companion animals than on people – it is much more common for an animal to get MRSA from their owner than the other way around.

Pets may therefore get MRSA from contact with their owners or other humans (such as owners or veterinary staff). As with humans, pets have immune systems and are at highest risk of actual MRSA infection (as opposed to carriage or colonization) when their immune system is compromised or if they have wounds (e.g. surgical incisions).

Hospitals always present a higher risk of infection. This is because they are closed environments (so people come into close contact with each other); there are lots of patients and staff coming in through the doors (who can therefore bring MRSA in); and there are large numbers of ill patients whose immune systems may not be working as well as normal (who can therefore get infections), as well as large numbers of surgical cases with big wounds.

For this reason we must all be particularly careful to practice good hygiene in hospitals!

All about infections

PC_skin_infections-header

Skin Infections & Pyoderma

1. How significant is infected dermatitis to the overall health of a dog? Superficial bacterial skin infections or pyoderma rarely cause significant illness. The clinical signs include itching, pustules, scaling [&hellip

GEN-impact-petcarers-girl-with-dog-header

MRSP

What are MRSP and Staphylococcus pseudintermedius? Staphylococcus pseudintermedius is a bacterium that is commonly found on the skin or in the nose or intestinal tract of 50% of more of [&hellip

PC-vet-labwork-header

Testing for MRSA

How do we test for MRSA? The only way to identify MRSA is to take a sample and analyse it in a laboratory. A culture can identify the bacteria and [&hellip

How we have Helped

The support I have received from Jill @ pets-mrsa has been invaluable. Through her I have been helped and given advice from several top veterinary surgeons and microbiologists. My dog [&hellip

Anna Foster

I am so grateful to Jill Moss and Lori Spagnoli for all the information and comfort they gave me during the nine month fight we had with MRSI. Our English [&hellip

Charlotte – Max

View more

Corporate Supporters

Educational Partners

Media Supporters

Supporters