UK Registered Charity 1122246 This website would not be possible without the kind help of Tony Martin of the “AV Martin Charitable Foundation”

Until the 1990s, most cases of MRSA in humans were caused by strains found in hospitals. These types were therefore called “Hospital-Associated” MRSA or “Healthcare-Associated” MRSA (HA-MRSA). These types of strains do not seem to spread easily in the community outside of the hospital, but are frequently resistant to large numbers of different antibiotics. They tend to affect older people or people with conditions that compromise their immune systems.

In the late 1990s, strains of MRSA behaving very differently were identified. They were resistant to fewer antibiotics, but could cause disease in people of all ages and did seem to spread in the community – hence being named Community-Associated MRSA (CA-MRSA). In the USA, one strain of CA-MRSA called USA300 has been causing particular problems and is now the commonest cause of skin and soft tissue infections presenting to Emergency Departments.

Presently, HA-MRSA seems to cause most MRSA infections in animals. CA-MRSA has only infrequently been associated with animals to date.

All about infections

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MRSA in Farm Animals

In 2005, the first report on MRSA in pigs came from The Netherlands. A relation was found between MRSA positive persons and living on a pig farm or working with [&hellip

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Testing for MRSA

How do we test for MRSA? The only way to identify MRSA is to take a sample and analyse it in a laboratory. A culture can identify the bacteria and [&hellip

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MRSP

What are MRSP and Staphylococcus pseudintermedius? Staphylococcus pseudintermedius is a bacterium that is commonly found on the skin or in the nose or intestinal tract of 50% of more of [&hellip

How we have Helped

Jasmine was a healthy 6 month old kitten and as responsible pet owners, we felt it was right to take her to the vets to be spayed. We had had [&hellip

Jasmine

Last month my thirteen-year-old miniature dachsund, Jenna, developed a swollen eye. I assumed that she had been bit by a spider or an ant, but after the swelling returned following [&hellip

Jill Vicino – Jenna

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