UK Registered Charity 1122246 This website would not be possible without the kind help of Tony Martin of the “AV Martin Charitable Foundation”

The risk factors for MRSA colonisation and subsequent infection are well established in people, but less so in animals. Humans who are most at risk will have had: 1) Exposure to healthcare facilities such as hospitals;
2) Previous surgical procedures;
3) Indwelling devices (e.g. surgical implants such as pins and bone screws);
4) Conditions which reduce the effectiveness of the immune system, such as:
a. underlying medical conditions such as diabetes and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV);
b. old age;
5) Previous MRSA episodes;
6) Prior antimicrobial use, particularly repeated courses of antibiotics.

All about infections

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Testing for MRSA

How do we test for MRSA? The only way to identify MRSA is to take a sample and analyse it in a laboratory. A culture can identify the bacteria and [&hellip

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Skin Infections & Pyoderma

1. How significant is infected dermatitis to the overall health of a dog? Superficial bacterial skin infections or pyoderma rarely cause significant illness. The clinical signs include itching, pustules, scaling [&hellip

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Spotting Infections

Infections can generally be treated successfully with a single course of antibiotics, which may come in the form of creams or ointments, injections, or tablets, and many infections will even [&hellip

How we have Helped

Our beautiful Momo, a black cat with one perfectly shaped white heart on her chest, came to us homeless one day, and of course we took her in. She changed [&hellip

Lori & Joseph – Momo

We have a very special and sweet golden retriever male dog named Bud. Bud is the only puppy that I have not rescued but picked out of a litter. Actually [&hellip

Gary and Angel – Bud

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