UK Registered Charity 1122246 This website would not be possible without the kind help of Tony Martin of the “AV Martin Charitable Foundation”

“The Bella Moss Foundation began in 2007, several months after the death of my beloved companion Samoyed, Bella, developed meticillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) following ligament surgery on her knee. Bella was the first publicly recorded dog to die of the human strain of MRSA”

(Jill Moss president  & founder BMF)
Read Bella’s Story 

“It seemed impossible to me that she should have lost her life because of a preventable infection, but at the time very little was known about MRSA in animals. I became determined that no-one else should have to feel so alone and helpless, and with that goal in mind, the Bella Moss Foundation was born”.   Nobody at The Foundation receives an income and we rely on donations and volunteers and goodwill to do our work.
Help us help others

Our uniqueness as a charity is that we bridge the gap between human and animal medicine in the care and treatment of antibiotic-resistant infections. We do this through education  and collaboration with our board of clinical advisors and educational partners.  View our  partners and collaborations and clinical advisors

Although we principally focus on animal health and welfare, the impact of our work crosses the human-animal boundary. The Bella Moss Foundation is allied to the One Health Initiative in that we are dedicated to improving the lives of all species – human to animal – through collaboration between human and veterinary medicine. http://www.onehealthinitiative.com/

WHAT WE DO WITH THE HELP OF OUR EDUCATIONAL PARTNERSHIPS  AND ADVISORS

The Foundation works to support, inform, advise and educate pet owners whose pets develop, or are at risk of developing, resistant infections.

Two volunteers with Jill at Cruft’s and a recovered MRSA dog

We offer relevant information on resistant infections and their prevention through our main website, our educational literature, and through our presence at companion animal events.

We provide up-to-date information and Continuing Professional Development (CPD) to vets and vet nurses.

Newspaper photo of the speakers and organisers of the 1st International Conference on MRSA in Animals, 2006

We also collaborate with human and animal health organisations to disseminate the latest academic research in antimicrobial  resistance  and engage with parliamentary groups to promote the foundation’s activities on animal health and welfare issues.

Did you know...

A small proportion of the human population carry MRSA without knowing it and without any ill-effects.

All about infections

PC-mrsa-in-horses-field-black-horse-header

MRSA In Horses

Staphylococcus aureus can also be found in the nose, intestinal tract or skin of a small percentage of normal, healthy horses, although the frequency with which it is found varies [&hellip

PC-mrsa-in-pigs-field-blue-skies-header

MRSA in Pigs

In spite of worrying reports of the spread of MRSA ST398 in pigs in Europe and N. America, in two recent, major EU surveys (EFSA 2009, 2010) the UK pig industry was [&hellip

GEN-bacteria-bugs-explained-header

Bugs Explained

Meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is only one of a number of bacteria that can be resistant to lots of different antibiotics. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a relatively common finding in long-standing [&hellip

How we have Helped

This is a picture of Ink and Spot, they are brothers. Sadly, Ink passed away August of 2009 after being misdiagnosed by numerous vets. I had not heard of the [&hellip

Barbara – Ink and Spot

Last month my thirteen-year-old miniature dachsund, Jenna, developed a swollen eye. I assumed that she had been bit by a spider or an ant, but after the swelling returned following [&hellip

Jill Vicino – Jenna

View more

Corporate Supporters

Educational Partners

Media Supporters

Supporters